Spiritual Care

Jesus Christ, whose birth we celebrate this month, came to live with us. Real people saw God with their eyes, touched him, and listened directly to the Word of God. What a powerful experience!

For Christian nurses, effective listening demonstrates the compassion, understanding, and care modeled by Jesus. His listening skills serve as a practical model for applying his love today.

592017mnIt’s often cold in Minnesota but “Hormones, Health and God” was a hot topic at an April seminar sponsored by NCF Twin Cities and Hosanna Church Called to Care Nurses.

262017sufferingHuman suffering is a universal problem. As nurses, we see plenty of it. We know there are no easy answers, so how do we address the problem of suffering?

2132017spiritualcarecardHow do you care for the spiritual needs of your patients? Knowing how to assess a person’s spiritual health and provide spiritual care interventions is part of caring for the whole person.

882016fgraceFormer NCF Director Grace Wallace reminds us of the opportunities we have as Christian nurses to address the spiritual needs of patients with professional, compassionate care for the whole person.

812016womanatwellAs Christian nurses, we have Jesus as our source of strength and role model. I love how Jesus sees all of us from the perspective of God’s Kingdom. This perspective teaches us how to see and think about people and thus how to care for patients and their families and collaborate with our co-workers.

5282016memorialdayOn Memorial Day we remember our fallen soldiers who sacrificed their lives for our country. As nurses, what can we do to care for veterans who need ongoing physical, emotional and spiritual care today?

4252016marylI am a nursing student at a Catholic-Jesuit university, so spirituality is integrated throughout our nursing curriculum. However, we do not have a space to reflect on how to have spiritual conversations with patients or how to process our clinical experiences from a spiritual perspective.

IV Drip“I’ve been an Infusion Room regular for over seven years. It’s like a local coffee shop, only with needles, tubes, and dangling fluid bags,” writes David Kenagy in the Journal of Christian Nursing.

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